The Blue Tones Flooring

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Home Improvement

How To Refinish A Vinyl Or Tile Foor Using Floor Finish

The following procedure is for reapplying coats to an already finished floor or applying finish to a new floor. When finishing a new floor always follow the manufacturers recommendations for prepping the floor. You should always consult the flooring manufacturer on the types of finishes that are suited to your floor. When finishing any floor we recommend that you use a quality floor finish that is correctly matched to your flooring. Our online floor finishing procedures are the general guidelines for finishing a floor. These days floor finish has become the alternative to old fashioned waxes. Floor finish can give a floor a great long lasting shine without the problems of conventional waxes.

Procedure:

Make sure that your floor has been prepared for finishing. Clean the floor removing as much dirt and debris as possible. If the floor has more than 5 coats of finish we recommend stripping the floor first. Too many layers of finish can dull a floor. Over time floor finish can yellow in color, if you see any yellowing on the floor we also recommend that you strip the floor first.

After the floor has been prepared, vacuum or dust mop the floor to remove any dust. We recommend that you spray your dust mop with dust mop treatment to remove as much dust as possible. Make sure to remove anything stuck to the floor, anything that is on the floor when you finish it will become part of the floor finish and you will have to strip your floor and begin again.

Make sure that the floor are you are finishing does not and will not have traffic moving through it for at least 12 – 24 hours depending on the type of finish that your are applying (see floor finish manufacturers specifications for curing and drying time). Use warning signs to make sure the area where you are finishing is marked out so that everyone is aware of the area.

Finishing a floor requires the use of two mop buckets. One bucket will be used to keep the finish mop damp and the other will be used to apply the floor finish. Line the floor finish bucket with a clear trash can liner so that you can dispose of the finish easily after the job is complete.

Fill one mop bucket 1/2 way up with water and the lined mop bucket 1/4 full with floor finish. Dip your finish mop into the water bucket and wring until the mop is damp and water does not drip from the end. Next, dip the damp mop into the floor finish and wring until the finish mop does not drip.

The best way to finish floors is to divide the floor into sections to assure that an even amount of floor finish is applied everywhere. Begin applying the floor finish at the furthest corner from the entrance. Apply floor finish to the baseboard area first (a block applicator can be a great tool for this job) working away from the corner. Make sure the floor finish is going on to the floor in a thin even coat.

After you have applied floor finish to the baseboard move on to the open areas of the floor. Move the mop head in a figure eight motion overlapping mopping sections by about an inch.

After you have applied the finish evenly to the entire area, let the floor dry. The floor should look glossy with no raised areas or drip marks. Follow the floor finish manufacturers recommendations for drying time. Depending on the floor finish you may wish to apply more than one coat of floor finish, if so, let the floor dry in between coats. You may also want to buff the floor in between coats so that the second coat adheres better to the first coat.

To maintain the new look of the floor finish you can burnish with a burnishing floor pad, again see the manufacturers recommendations for maintenance on your floor.

After 12 hours your floor should be fully cured. Floor traffic can now resume.

Wood Floor Repair – Why It Pays to Get the Professionals In

postBeautiful solid wood flooring can look wonderful, creating a real sense of style and individuality and a modern, contemporary feel within any home. There are many different types of real wood flooring, each with a look that is entirely its own. Aged or distressed flooring, the distinctive lines of parquet flooring, there’s engineered wood flooring and strip floors as well as mosaic panels and end grain wood block floors.

Aged & distressed flooring

Aged wood flooring or distressed flooring presents a stylish, lived in look. It looks, for all the world, as if your flooring has been laid for years and adds a certain authenticity to your home. Aged and distressed flooring is also a very practical choice for both homes and commercial properties because it keeps looking good for longer. The rugged, worn, lived in appearance will not show the scratches and marks caused by everyday usage. They are also a popular choice because they never require sanding unlike other types of wood floors.

Parquet flooring

Parquet wooden floors are a very popular choice and one of the reasons for this is that a parquet floor can be laid in so many different ways, with so many different patterns. The patterns available are Herringbone, Double Herringbone, Single Basket Weave, Treble Basket Weave and Chevron. You can also opt for parquet panels, parquet borders, parquet motifs and parquet floor medallions.

Engineered wood flooring

Engineered floors can be installed which either floating on underlay, are secretly nailed to existing wood sub floors or fully glued to the concrete or timber sub floor. Engineered floors are very good if you need to reduce the noise level in a room and they work well with under floor heating systems. Engineered wood floors are available in a wide range of sizes from 14mm 3 strip floors to 20mm structural engineered wide planks. Strip Floors

There is wide choice of solid tongue and grooved strip flooring available which his available in European Oak, French Oak, American Black Walnut, Wenge, Distressed Oak, Reclaimed Pine and Merbau. Strip wood floors, like engineered wood flooring, can be secret nailed to timber sub floors or glued to concrete sub floors but unlike engineered wood floors, they are not recommended for use with under floor heating systems. Strip floors are very easy to maintain and can be sanded many times to refresh their look making them great value for money.

Mosaic Panels Mosaic Panels, also known as finger parquet, is an old style of flooring used a lot in the 1960’s and is available in European Oak, Mahogany, Teak and Merbau. If fitting mosaic panels to a wood or concrete base, an epoxy glue should be used but if the panels have a felt backing then a spirit based adhesive should be used. End grain wood block floors

End grain wood block flooring is available in a number of wood species including European Larch, European Oak, European Smoked Oak, Pine and Spruce. The wood is cut across the growth rings to produce a very different look to that achieved using the more usual strip flooring. It is extremely hard wearing and so is ideal for areas that experience a lot of foot traffic.

Wood floor repairs

From time to time your wooden floor will need repairing, either to remove scratches or stains or even to correct a floor that was badly laid in the first place. Scratches can be sanded away using fine to medium sand paper but it is recommended that any stained floorboards be replaced because, depending how deeply the stain has entered the wood, you may have to sand quite hard to get the stain out and this could mean that section of flooring will not look the same as the rest.

If you are fortunate enough to inherit an original wood floor or are looking to restore a floor you covered years ago with carpet, you may need to carry out some repairs. This may involve replacing sections of the old wood floor with new wood. Should you need to do this, it is advisable to source wood that, as closely as possible, matches the original wood, in colour and type.

Once the repairs have been carried out, the floor should be machine sanded to a fine finish and any gaps filled. With this done you can set about staining the floor to your chosen colour. Sometimes, stains in your flooring will only become apparent after the floor is machine sanded or even after applying the new chosen finish. If this happens, you may choose to replace that section or leave it because it adds character to your floor.

Original parquet floors were glued and pinned using copper headed pins. Over the years, these eroded leaving staining around each fixing. Unfortunately these stains cannot be removed, but it must be said, they form part of the floors character. When installing new parquet flooring, stainless steel headless pins are used to prevent this problem from occurring in the future.

Why it is important to hire a professional?

With the ever increasing number of DIY shows on television, a lot of people are attempting to restore their own wood floors only to find it’s not as easy as it looks on telly. Professional wooden floor restoration companies will have invested in the right machinery for the job and also in the right training.

Having no experience and using machines which are not forgiving can cause extreme damage to your wood floor and can reduce its life by as much as 50% so it is important to employ a company whose employees are fully trained and qualified in wood floor restoration. This will ensure that the smallest amount of wood is removed during the sanding process and will therefore extend the life of your floor.

Hiring a professional to do the job will leave you with the perfect finish and may even end up saving you money, after all it would be a lot more expensive to attempt the job yourself, hire the machines, buy the sand paper and finishing materials, only to then have to hire in the professionals to redo the job afterward because you are unhappy with the finish.

What should a person look for when choosing a flooring supplier?

When looking for a company to supply and fit your flooring, you should look for a company that can prove the quality of their work. Ask to see examples of their work or at least pictures of it and ask them to produce genuine testimonials.

Ask to see proof of their qualifications. Properly qualified UK flooring contractors will have passed City & Guilds NVQ Level 2 in floor coverings and should have passed there health & safety test and hold a valid CSCS card for commercial works.

Check out the equipment they plan to use and ask what measures they put in place to minimise dust, the last thing you want is to be cleaning the house for weeks after they’ve gone.

Confirm that they offer a free no-obligation survey and quotation.

How to Evaluate and Care for Hard Wood Floors

Hardwood floors can create a feeling of warmth and elegance in a home or business. However, hardwood floors can also be a nightmare for your cleaning company to keep looking good. Knowing what to do and when to do it will help you to keep hardwood floors in prime condition.

Before beginning a maintenance program on a hardwood floor it’s a good idea to ask questions about the background of the floor (finish used, when it was last sanded, etc.). If that information isn’t available, then you’ll need to assess the floor to determine the condition of the floor. Some basic observations of the wood and the finish will help to determine what type of cleaning or refinishing is needed.

Begin by evaluating the condition of the wood. If the floor has extensive damage, warped boards and a lot of wear, the entire floor may need to be replaced. But that is the worst case scenario. Inspect the entire floor, including the edges, and look for differences in the level of the floor. Following are categories you can assign to the floor:

A. Overall very good condition. The hardwood floor looks good or may even be new. The floor may just need a good cleaning to get its luster back.

B. Slight scuffed. The floor is in fairly good condition, however, has a few scuffs and scratches, especially in high traffic areas.

C. Heavy wear. The floor has quite a few scratches, scrapes and dents and looks worn in places. It may even have a few expansion cracks.

D. Warped appearance. The boards in the floor have some minor warping, uneven boards, and many scratches and scrapes.

Next decide the condition of the finish. The condition of the finish may be related to the condition of the wood. For instance if there are deep cuts, scratches or chips in the finish they may go through the finish and into the wood itself. Look at the finish decide what categories are applicable:

A. The floor has a finish, but it looks dirty. The floor most likely just needs a good cleaning to get back that glossy luster.

B. The finish has light scratches, dings and chips and is worn (or is dull) in heavy traffic areas.

C. The finish is chipped in many places. Although the floor definitely has a finish, there are light scrapes, scratches and dings throughout the finish.

D. Finish is worn. There is little or no finish on the floor. The finish may appear to have deep gouges from dragging furniture across it.

E. No finish. The finish is gone or chipped and has a poor appearance.

If the wood and the finish are in good or reasonably good condition, a good cleaning and starting up a routine maintenance program is the next step. If the wood (category C, D or E) or finish (C, D or E) is in bad shape, you may need to do more research or consult a professional on the best way to proceed.

Properly maintaining hardwood floors is important to keep them looking good and extend their lifespan. It is extremely important to remove all the dirt, dropped food, grit and other debris that can end up on and ground into hardwood floors. Dirt that is not removed quickly can be “camouflaged” in the pattern or color of the wood making it not only difficult to see, but easy to ignore. There are several tools that you can use to remove dirt:

1. Brooms- make sure to use a broom that has “exploded” ends that can sweep up dust and fine grit.

2. Vacuums – Any type except an upright vacuum with a beater bar and brushes. These can cause damage to the floor.

3. Dust mop. Dust mopping and vacuuming are the most effective methods of removing debris from floors. If using a dust mop, buy a high quality mop with an eighteen inch head. Treat the mop with a dust mop treatment so it grabs the dirt and doesn’t just push it around.

Sweeping, vacuuming or dust mopping regularly is great for getting rid of the dirt, but you will still need to clean the floor. The best method to use is to mop the floor. Use a neutral cleaner (pH of 7) that is for use on hardwood floors and follow the product’s directions. Following are a few tips that will help to protect any hardwood floors that you care for:

Good matting is the best way to keep damaging soil and grit from getting onto and ground into the floor. Mats on the outside entryway will help to remove some soils. Make sure any mat(s) used inside (and on the floor) is a good quality rug that does not have a rubber coating. Plasticizers used on some rugs can “migrate” or move from the rug and into the finish of the wood floor.

High heels can cause permanent damage to hardwood floors. The spikes on heels can create dimples in hardwood floors. In a business it may not be possible to keep high heels off the hardwood floors, but if you are cleaning a residential floor, you can let the homeowner know of the problems associated with high heels.

Dragging furniture across the floor. This can cause scratches and dents in the floor. Anytime furniture needs to be moved it should be lifted and carried. Furniture legs need to be in good shape. A loose leg on a chair can dig into the floor’s finish anytime someone sits down in the chair.

Spills (food, cleaners, alcohol, oils) can damage the finish and the wood. Clean up spills as soon as possible.

Bright sunlight can bleach, darken or dry out wood. It may be necessary to cover windows with drapes or blinds to keep the ultraviolet rays off the wood.

Harsh cleaners can damage a floor’s finish. When cleaning floors use a neutral cleaner that is designed for use on wood floors. A beautiful looking hardwood floor will get noticed. Keeping the floors properly maintenance will keep the floor looking lustrous, your customers happy, and your cash flowing!

Hardwood Floor Care Will Keep Your Hardwood Looking Fantastic

Hardwood is still the homeowner’s favorite choice of flooring and caring for it takes minimal effort. Unlike laminate or engineered wood, hardwood can be refinished many times, and will add years of beauty and warmth to your home, as well as increase its value and speed its resale. Ongoing floor care is needed to keep your hardwood looking its best, however, and there are four major aspects of hardwood floor care:

1. Hardwood floor cleaning

2. Hardwood floor repair

3. Hardwood floor refinishing

4. Hardwood floor protection

Clean Your Hardwood Regularly

Knowing how to clean hardwood floors is important because the bane of hardwood is dirt and grit, which will scratch and mark the floor if not removed promptly. As well, dust is seen more easily on wood floors than it is on linoleum or on carpet, especially in the sunlight and especially if the floor has a dark stain. Hardwood floor care, therefore, means sweeping and dusting regularly – once a week, at least, and after any event that leaves dirt and grit behind. Regular household dusting and cleaning products will cause damage, however, and you must use only products specifically designed for hardwood. Vacuuming is preferable to sweeping because it allows the dirt and dust to be pulled from between the boards, but use a vacuum with a bare floor attachment, not a beater bar, which can damage the wood.

When a more in-depth cleaning is required, use a cleaning method appropriate to the finish on your floor. If your floor has a glossy finish, it means that polyurethane, or a water-based urethane, or a similar finish has been used to form a protective barrier over the hardwood. If it has a matte finish, it means that the floor is protected with a penetrating seal of oil and/or wax. On neither of these finishes is water an acceptable cleaning agent, but both of them can accept a surface, damp-mop cleaning, which means the mop is not wet but only damp to the touch. You are cleaning only the surface and not using enough water to penetrate even the oiled-and-waxed hardwood. When using a damp mop on oil and waxed hardwood, you can add a little neutral ph hardwood floor cleaner to the water before dipping the mop into it. A floor with a protective glossy barrier can accept a generic hardwood floor cleaner providing it doesn’t contain any wax or oil.

The don’ts are every bit as important as the do’s in hardwood floor care;

1. Don’t use ammonia, regular floor cleaners, household cleaners, or dusting products on hardwood.

2. Never use wax on a floor with a urethane or other glossy finish.

3. Never wash hardwood; use only a slightly damp mop.

Repair Any Damage to Your Floors as Soon as Possible

In most cases, when your oil and waxed hardwood floors have suffered surface damage, you have to remove the finish with a wax or oil stripper before dealing with the damage. After completing the repair, you then re-wax or re-oil the area. Surface damage occurs less often on hardwood protected by polyurethane or a similar type of sealer, and when it does, the damage is not as obvious. When repairing floors with such finishes, strip the finish from the entire board or boards where the damage has occurred. Make your repairs and then apply a finishing product to those boards that is consistent with the rest of the floor.

1. Water marks: Remove the protective finish, rub the marks with fine grade steel wool. Repeat if necessary, clean, and then refinish.

2. Burn marks: Lightly sand the area, use a damp cloth to pick up the grit, and then refinish as desired.

3. Scratches and gouges: Conceal shallow scratches with matching wood putty or a putty stick. After the area is dry, sand and refinish.

Refinishing Your Worn Hardwood Floors Will Recapture Their Original Beauty and Value

In a home with shabby hardwood floors, the biggest improvement you can make is to refinish the floors. Begin by making any necessary repairs, and then removing all the furniture and drapes and sealing the vents and registers in the room so that you won’t spread dust throughout the house. Sanding floors is easiest to do with a drum sander and an edging machine for the sides and corners of the room. You can rent these machines, and it is a good idea to rent a buffer or floor polisher at the same time. Plan to make three passes with your sanding equipment, using increasingly finer sandpaper each time. Vacuum carefully and pick up every bit of fine dust and grit with tacking cloths. All dust and dirt must be removed. You can now apply a stain if you wish or you can leave the natural color and design of the wood – such as the popular oak, maple, or cherry – to be displayed.

Polish and clean the dust and dirt from the floor again, and then apply your sealer – a polyurethane or a water-based urethane that provides a protective barrier, or oil and wax, which penetrates the wood and protects from within. Carefully read all the information accompanying each product, follow the safety advice, and apply as many coats of stain or sealer as suggested by the manufacturer of the products you are using.

Hardwood Floor Care Means Providing Ongoing Floor Protection

As well as regular cleaning, and repairing and refinishing when necessary, there are a number of protective measures you can take to preserve the beauty of your hardwood:

1. Use area rugs and mats in high traffic areas and sites of frequent spills (e.g., in front of the stove, sink, and refrigerator). Move these rugs frequently so that these areas of the floor remain the same color as the exposed floor. As well, it is best to choose cotton mats as they do not trap water under them as rubber or vinyl might.

2. Keep high-heeled shoes in good repair and avoid using stiletto heels.

3. Keep nails trimmed on pets.

4. Clean up spills immediately with a paper towel or dry cloth. A damp cloth can be used for sticky spills, but dry the spot immediately afterwards with another towel or cloth.

5. Lift rather than drag furniture when moving it and use felt contacts under furniture legs to prevent scratches and gouges.

6. Use sheers or blinds to protect your floors from the discoloration caused by direct sun rays.

With proper care and maintenance, your hardwood floors will retain their beauty and enhance any décor that you choose. When your floors become worn, or if they become damaged, they can be restored to their former glory with a little time, effort, and money. Use the Internet to check out quality products, read the information on how to use them, compare prices, and place your orders. We can help with all your hardwood floor care needs – everything from discount hardwood flooring to hardwood cleaners – and all items can be purchased online and delivered to your door. Let us help you keep your hardwood floors looking their best.

Hot Tips on Radiant-Heated Floors

postYou’re remodeling the bathroom and have dreams of adding some spa like comforts. A garden tub with pulsating jets, luxurious tile and comfortable fixtures come to mind. And maybe even a heated floor. Lots of people are considering radiant-heated floors because of that extra level of spa-like comfort. Before you make a decision about a heated floor, you should know some of the pros and cons of these types of heating systems. Here’s a brief run down on the main types of systems and the pros and cons for using this type of heating system. Of course, your local HVAC professional will have more detailed information.

Heating Floor Systems: Which to Choose?

There are two main types of radiant-heated floors. The first is electric, which provides heat through electrically heated coils. The second is hydronic, which provides heat through water-filled tubes. The tubes can be heated in a variety of ways using solar power, oil, gas or kerosene. Not sure which to choose? Ask your local HVAC professional for their advice.

The Upside of Electric Radiant-Heated Floors

If you are adding heated floors to the bathrooms or to the whole house, there are some definite positives to radiant-heated flooring. The first of course is comfort. There is nothing like waking up on a cold morning and putting your feet on warm hardwood floors. Radiant-heated floors also take up no extra space. Because this type of flooring is installed underneath the floors, it is completely out of sight except for the thermostat. Usage cost is a pro as well. Users of radiant-heated flooring report about a 15 percent to 30 percent increase in their heating bills, depending on the size flooring they have installed. Contact your local HVAC professional to get a more localized estimate. Durability is also a great factor with radiant heated floors. Protected by two solid layers, these systems were designed to last. And on the plus side, the installation time is fairly short. Allergy sufferers benefit from these systems too! They provide cozy warmth without blowing around a lot of dust.

The Downside of Electric Radiant-Heated Floors

There are a few down sides to adding an electric heated floor. One is the heated floor system can’t be retrofitted under your existing floors. Your local HVAC specialist will have to take up the old floor, install the heated system and replace the flooring. Look to spend about $15 to $20 per square foot. Also, you may need new wiring from the main electric circuit panel in order to adequately power your heating system. And lastly, radiant flooring doesn’t heat up as quickly as a space heater. You may have to wait for an hour before your floors are warm.

The Upside of Hydronic Radiant-Heated Floors

You’ll find the same positives as you did with the electric system in addition to some fuel-cost savings. Whether you go with solar or oil, these electric alternatives will save you money. Ask your HVAC specialist which system he recommends and why.

The Downside of a Hydronic Heated Floor

Add the same cons as the electric counterpart plus one more. While electric systems are durable, with a hydronic heated floor, you have the chance of experiencing water damage. With a significant leak there could be damage to your floors, your furniture and your home. Contact your local HVAC professional for his suggestions on radiant-heated floors.

You’re remodeling the bathroom and have dreams of adding some spa like comforts. A garden tub with pulsating jets, luxurious tile and comfortable fixtures come to mind. And maybe even a heated floor. Lots of people are considering radiant-heated floors because of that extra level of spa-like comfort. Before you make a decision about a heated floor, you should know some of the pros and cons of these types of heating systems. Here’s a brief run down on the main types of systems and the pros and cons for using this type of heating system. Of course, your local HVAC professional will have more detailed information.

Heating Floor Systems: Which to Choose?

There are two main types of radiant-heated floors. The first is electric, which provides heat through electrically heated coils. The second is hydronic, which provides heat through water-filled tubes. The tubes can be heated in a variety of ways using solar power, oil, gas or kerosene. Not sure which to choose? Ask your local HVAC professional for their advice.

The Upside of Electric Radiant-Heated Floors

If you are adding heated floors to the bathrooms or to the whole house, there are some definite positives to radiant-heated flooring. The first of course is comfort. There is nothing like waking up on a cold morning and putting your feet on warm hardwood floors. Radiant-heated floors also take up no extra space. Because this type of flooring is installed underneath the floors, it is completely out of sight except for the thermostat. Usage cost is a pro as well. Users of radiant-heated flooring report about a 15 percent to 30 percent increase in their heating bills, depending on the size flooring they have installed. Contact your local HVAC professional to get a more localized estimate. Durability is also a great factor with radiant heated floors. Protected by two solid layers, these systems were designed to last. And on the plus side, the installation time is fairly short. Allergy sufferers benefit from these systems too! They provide cozy warmth without blowing around a lot of dust.

The Downside of Electric Radiant-Heated Floors

There are a few down sides to adding an electric heated floor. One is the heated floor system can’t be retrofitted under your existing floors. Your local HVAC specialist will have to take up the old floor, install the heated system and replace the flooring. Look to spend about $15 to $20 per square foot. Also, you may need new wiring from the main electric circuit panel in order to adequately power your heating system. And lastly, radiant flooring doesn’t heat up as quickly as a space heater. You may have to wait for an hour before your floors are warm.

The Upside of Hydronic Radiant-Heated Floors

You’ll find the same positives as you did with the electric system in addition to some fuel-cost savings. Whether you go with solar or oil, these electric alternatives will save you money. Ask your HVAC specialist which system he recommends and why.

The Downside of a Hydronic Heated Floor

Add the same cons as the electric counterpart plus one more. While electric systems are durable, with a hydronic heated floor, you have the chance of experiencing water damage. With a significant leak there could be damage to your floors, your furniture and your home. Contact your local HVAC professional for his suggestions on radiant-heated floors.

You’re remodeling the bathroom and have dreams of adding some spa like comforts. A garden tub with pulsating jets, luxurious tile and comfortable fixtures come to mind. And maybe even a heated floor. Lots of people are considering radiant-heated floors because of that extra level of spa-like comfort. Before you make a decision about a heated floor, you should know some of the pros and cons of these types of heating systems. Here’s a brief run down on the main types of systems and the pros and cons for using this type of heating system. Of course, your local HVAC professional will have more detailed information.

Heating Floor Systems: Which to Choose?

There are two main types of radiant-heated floors. The first is electric, which provides heat through electrically heated coils. The second is hydronic, which provides heat through water-filled tubes. The tubes can be heated in a variety of ways using solar power, oil, gas or kerosene. Not sure which to choose? Ask your local HVAC professional for their advice.

The Upside of Electric Radiant-Heated Floors

If you are adding heated floors to the bathrooms or to the whole house, there are some definite positives to radiant-heated flooring. The first of course is comfort. There is nothing like waking up on a cold morning and putting your feet on warm hardwood floors. Radiant-heated floors also take up no extra space. Because this type of flooring is installed underneath the floors, it is completely out of sight except for the thermostat. Usage cost is a pro as well. Users of radiant-heated flooring report about a 15 percent to 30 percent increase in their heating bills, depending on the size flooring they have installed. Contact your local HVAC professional to get a more localized estimate. Durability is also a great factor with radiant heated floors. Protected by two solid layers, these systems were designed to last. And on the plus side, the installation time is fairly short. Allergy sufferers benefit from these systems too! They provide cozy warmth without blowing around a lot of dust.

The Downside of Electric Radiant-Heated Floors

There are a few down sides to adding an electric heated floor. One is the heated floor system can’t be retrofitted under your existing floors. Your local HVAC specialist will have to take up the old floor, install the heated system and replace the flooring. Look to spend about $15 to $20 per square foot. Also, you may need new wiring from the main electric circuit panel in order to adequately power your heating system. And lastly, radiant flooring doesn’t heat up as quickly as a space heater. You may have to wait for an hour before your floors are warm.

The Upside of Hydronic Radiant-Heated Floors

You’ll find the same positives as you did with the electric system in addition to some fuel-cost savings. Whether you go with solar or oil, these electric alternatives will save you money. Ask your HVAC specialist which system he recommends and why.

The Downside of a Hydronic Heated Floor

Add the same cons as the electric counterpart plus one more. While electric systems are durable, with a hydronic heated floor, you have the chance of experiencing water damage. With a significant leak there could be damage to your floors, your furniture and your home. Contact your local HVAC professional for his suggestions on radiant-heated floors.

How is Laminate Flooring Made and How Do I Protect My New Laminate Floor?

How is Laminate flooring made and how do I protect my new Laminate floor?

Laminate flooring has grown by leaps and bounds in a very short period of time. The reason behind the rapid laminate wood flooring growth is the ease of installing laminate flooring. This wood flooring system is a floating floor that has a laminate flooring underlayment on which the laminate floor lays over top of. Another benefit to having a laminate floor system is the durability of the floor. Laminate flooring manufacturers are using new technologies to create a very dense fiber wood core with a very durable top plastic coating.

Constructions of laminate floors

There are basically two types of laminate floor constructions. You have the direct pressure laminate and the high pressure laminate. The two different styles vary in the way they are attached to the core. The direct pressure process is a one step process where they fuse all the layers directly to the core all at the same time by using melamine resins and pressure and heat they are impregnated and together to form a very durable laminate plank flooring. The other high pressure laminate flooring is a two layer process. The first is that the craft paper style sheets will be glued together and using a print film, which is then glued to the core. Here everything is glued together and using high pressure they become very hard and durable.

What is available for Laminate flooring?

The laminate wood flooring is almost invincible to spills, stains, burns and a very high tolerance to scratches. Laminate flooring prices have such a wide range but can offer you just about any replicas of any wood species that you would desire. They will come in a few different varieties such as the single strip, two strips or even the three strips with micro beveled edges, square edges or just beveled edges. Depending on the quality you are looking for the top finishes and treatments will vary the price of the laminate wood flooring. Because these floors can imitate just about any flooring on the market, your choices for texture and looks give you an abundance of choices such as traditional stone, ceramic tiles and beautiful hardwood.

Caring for your Laminate floor

Laminate flooring is stain and fade along with scratch resistant and with a few preventive maintenance ways you can have your floor last a very long time. First you must follow the laminate flooring manufacturer’s limitations and by keeping their recommendations in consideration you will have a floor that will last forever.

Your Maintenance and laminate wood flooring care

· Place designer mats in front of stoves and sinks along with all the room entrances

· Always have felt protectors under the feet of furniture

· Use chair coasters that are clean and working properly will help

· One of the biggest things you can do is to try and follow the laminate floor manufacturers recommendations for room temperature and what they recommend for humidity levels

Maintaining laminate flooring

Laminate flooring is very durable and not that hard to keep clean. All you have to do is regularly sweep or vacuum with a soft brush. Damp mop the laminate wood floor using a bit of ammonia or vinegar and water being careful not to flood the work panels as you can damage them this way. Some products that are not recommended for your laminate floor are soaps, scouring powder, floor polish or steel wool as these may damage the laminate wood flooring. Always test a product that you are unsure of in a low visible area. If you have to remove a stain use the recommended laminate floor cleaner and mop up to keep any water from entering the joints. Also make sure you use a damp mop and not a wet one.

Enjoy The Beauty Of Hardwood With The Endurance Of Laminate Flooring

Everyone likes the beautiful, timeless look of hardwood floors. Elegant, yet simple, hardwood is stunning. But take a closer look. Is that hardwood scratched and dented? Are those stains and fade marks that you see there? Maybe that hardwood floor is not as nice as you originally thought.

If you like the look and the timeless appearance of hardwood floors but not want the scratches, dents and fade marks that will come with it than laminate flooring is a good option for you. Besides the fact that laminate is much more durable than traditional hardwood flooring, it is much cheaper as well. While you are upgrading your floor, this may be the best time to update your windows. Companies like Winston Salem roofing can help you chose the perfect windows to match your new floor.

What Is Laminate Flooring?

Laminate flooring is a composite product that looks like a wood product; however, you can care for it as if you would your laminate countertop. Laminate flooring is made of a high-density core with an image placed on the top layer and sealed with a laminate covering. Laminate flooring has a water repellent placed on it and good quality floors are infused with water repellent throughout the core.

What Kind Of Laminate Floor Should I Get?

When you are choosing your laminate floor you will need to take a few things into consideration. The first thing that you need to look at is where you are going to put the floor. Are you looking at a high traffic area that will see a lot of use? Alternatively, is the area that you are covering a smaller, low traffic area? If you are looking at covering a low traffic area, you will probably be able to get away with a laminate flooring that has a smaller core.

The core sizes of laminate flooring vary from around 6mm to 12 mm. The thicker the core in the flooring, the better the stability is. In addition, if you have a thicker core it will stand up better to wear and tear is likely to last you longer than a thinner core.

If you are thinking of moving to a different home in the next few years, you may want to go with a lesser quality of laminate flooring as well. Usually when people purchase a home, the flooring is the first thing that they change so there is no point spending a lot of money on a floor when you are going to move homes.

Most laminate floor come with warranties starting around ten years long. Generally, the more expensive floor types will come with longer warranties. Be sure to read your warranties very carefully however, as some warranties may not cover floor placement in the kitchen or bathroom.

Can I do It Myself?

One of the biggest appeals of laminate flooring is that most people can install them by themselves. You can install most laminate coverings over sheet vinyl, concrete slabs, plywood underlay, existing hardwood or any other flat and level surface.

The glue less Pergo flooring is a very popular choice because it does not require any glue to install properly or any other special tools of any kind. Therefore, anyone can do it himself or herself without any special training. Even if you have never installed a floor before, or do not have a lot of home renovation experience, laminate flooring is easily installed.

One of the biggest benefits to installing the floor yourself is that you can save thousands of dollars on installation fees. Unlike hardwood floors that are already very pricy, and need to be installed professionally, laminate is quick and easy, even for the beginner.

What About In The Kitchen?

Laminate flooring is a good choice for the kitchen and bathroom because it is water repellent. The core of laminate floors have been infused with water repellent to protect from everyday spills that happen. However if you are looking at installing your floor in the kitchen or bathroom you may want to look at purchasing a floor that has been infused with a paraffin wax in the joints in order to further repel water and avoid swelling.

Unlike hardwood floors, laminate is a much better choice for kitchens or bathrooms. Because we all know that spills happen. Water and food spills can stain traditional hardwood floors, and with laminate, you simply wipe them up and it is all taken care of.

Choose The Right Floor

Laminate flooring is available in many different styles, colors and patterns. There is something to suit everyone no matter what your style preference may be. When you go shopping for laminate flooring, you will encounter many different brands such as Pergo, Armstrong and Bruce. Since laminate was introduced in 1982, its market share has been growing in leaps and bounds. You will be able to find laminate in many price ranges, so there is something to suit everyone and everyone’s budget.